Check out this surreal sunset shot taken on our tour last evening under the Deception Pass Bridge! There are only TWO evening La Conner wildlife cruises remaining for the season, and this is one of the few weeks of the year that the sunset and bridge line up perfectly. Book your spot now for either Wednesday, Sept. 13th or Saturday, Sept. 16th. Tours depart from La Conner at 6:00 PM and tickets are just $29 plus taxes and fees! #lovelaconner, #goskagit, #islandadventures

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Meet Ollie! Sea otters are a rare sight in the Salish Sea, but one male sea otter, affectionally nicknamed “Ollie” by locals, has taken up residence near Race Rocks Ecological Reserve, a spot often visited on our Port Angeles trip. Our naturalist, Erica, caught him lounging in the kelp on yesterday’s tour – check it out!

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Tomorrow kicks off our Save Big Fall promotion! Now through Dec. 24th, get $20 off each adult ticket and $10 off each child ticket for any midweek whale watching tour. Great weather, great whales, and smaller group sizes make this one of the best times of year to go whale watching! Book online today at www.orcawhales.com!

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Kicking off the Holiday Weekend with a Bang!

Anacortes

10:00 AM

Our morning tour took is down the road (or route) less traveled – under Deception Pass Bridge and into Saratoga Passage!  More frequently known as being our springtime gray whale feeding grounds, we found a group of active transient orcas along the Camano Island shoreline.  The group turned out to be the T137’s, T37A1, and T36.  Throughout the encounter the were porpoising, tail slapping, spy hopping, and as a grand finale, we saw FIVE breaches from the large male, T137A!  On the way home we traveled through Swinomish Channel to complete our circumnavigation of Fidalgo Island, spotting a bald eagle in a tree, black oystercatchers on the rocks, and passing under the Rainbow Bridge in La Conner.


3:30 PM

Our afternoon tour was full of non-stop action!  Just minutes into the tour, we stopped to watch a feeding Steller sea lion in Guemes Channel.  Near Lawson Reef we found a minke whale working on a bait ball within view of Deception Pass Bridge and another Steller sea lion thrashing around a large skate.  After a few quick looks at a second minke whale in front of Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, we continued out into the Strait of Juan de Fuca where we encountered a group of transient orcas traveling west a few miles north of Protection Island.  The group turned out to be the T46B’s.  They seemed to be in a swift travel mode, but we were able to pace them perfectly and travel with them for a while.  As we bid farewell to them, we started to see quite a lot of activity in the distance including the dorsal fin of a “mystery whale” (most likely another minke) and several humpback spouts.  The winds were building, but we were able to get a few brief looks at the closest of the humpbacks before having to call it a day.  We had a great ride home and even got to catch the sunset!

Port Angeles

9:30 AM

Couldn’t have asked for a better Saturday morning! Before guests arrived, we were greeted at the dock by two raccoons hunting crabs! With glassy seas and blue sunny skies overhead, we left port angeles in search of wildlife! Our first stop was at the tip of Ediz Hook where a few sleepy harbor seals were resting in the sun. With early morning reports, we headed north across the strait toward Vancouver island. When we arrived at Beechey Head, we encountered the T11s who were slowly traveling west. We got amazing looks as these whales before turning and heading to the Race Rocks lighthouse where there were many stellar sea lions, barking California sea lions, and our resident sea otter Ollie taking a snooze in the kelp! As we were leaving race rocks, we spotted a blow nearby, a humpback whale!! The whale appeared to be doing some feeding on the tide lines and we got many excellent viewing opportunities. A few minutes into the encounter, a different pod of orca came from the west and swam right over to the humpback and passed over the humpback barely by inches before continuing east. These killer whales were the T99s! With one final look to see if the humpback made it out unscathed, we said our goodbyes and headed back to the dock! 






3:00 PM

The beautiful weather continued into the afternoon! After leaving the harbor we headed north across the strait toward Discovery Island where there was a report of transient killer whales! When we arrived, we were greeted by the T99s who were now joined by the T36Bs! They seemed to be curious as they made a couple close passes to the boat! We watched as they continued on toward the San Juan island coastline. We made our turn back south and as we were crossing the strait, a passenger spotted us a blow in the distance – a humpback whale we recognized as MMY0004! It was a race against the fog that was rolling in but we managed a couple great looks at the tail flukes before the whale was swallowed in fog. We then headed back home, happy about our double whammy whale show on both trips! 

La Conner

South down the channel. Several gbhs, cormorants, caspian terns, and black oystercatchers as we exited. Harbor seals hauled out on Seal Rocks, also more black oystercatchers on the rocks. Under the bridge. Several bait balls as we transited the south side of Rosario Strait and along the Lopez shoreline. Steller sea lions hauled out on Whale Rocks. Headed in for lunch. Canada geese as we exited Fisherman’s Bay. Headed south out to the Strait of Juan de Fuca again. Toward deception Pass, under the bridge and down to Saratoga Passage. We found some orcas headed south in the middle of the passage. It was the T137s, T36 and T37A1. They were spread out, cruising south down the passage. We had some nice looks as they swam in a rhythmic breathing sequence. We headed back toward homeport after a wonderful day on the perfectly pristine September day.


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T-Party w/ humpbacks in Port Angeles and multiple groups of Transient killer whales from Anacortes


Port Angeles




9:30AMSuperpod of transients and a double header. Wow what a day we had. Sunny and warm with beautiful  calm seas as we passed through the harbor and out into the straits.  Harbor Seals  lazily watched us from the shore and the surf as we went by Ediz hook. We headed  out searching for whales and spotted a sea lion swimming along but he quickly disappeared into the depths. Not long into our trip we heard of incoming  orcas and there were lots of them. We hoped maybe our residents had returned but they turned out to be the transient orcas. We spotted a groups in the distance and headed that way and soon there were more groups popping up all over. It was a superpod of orcas  spread out socializing . we turned off the engines and lowered the hydrophone down and heard the most amazing vocals as they stopped and played near us. We know the T11’s , the T60’s and the T46B’s were in the mix but there were so many others popping up. We watched them roll and spyhop  as they moved eastward. It even looked like one group made a kill along the way. As they continued east we decided to check out some humpback whales  a little further west of us and found BCZ0180 Monarch feeding and a second unknown humpback feeding nearby. we had some super looks  at their flukes as they dove and could even see a third humpback off in the distance. Since we were not far from racetracks we headed over there  to check out the lighthouse and all the pinnipeds. We could hear the California sea lions  barking way before we got there. The stellar sea lions were making a racket too as they growled at one another and the harbor seals rested in silence. We were even treated to Ollie the sea otter sleeping  in the kelp. What an awesome day!!!



Anacortes


10:00AM


To those who have been out with us before the day started off fairly similar to any other day: westbound down Guemes Channel, then south into Rosario Straight.  But once we got near by Deception Pass we took a turn and went under the bridge!  This is a fairly rare treat for our Anacortes tours and it does not happen all too often.  Once we were through the pass, the little bit of fog we were encountering cleared and gave us some beautiful views of the bridge.  We continued our journey southbound into Saratoga Passage which lies between Camano and Whidbey Islands.  There we were treated to spending time with the T100 transient orca family: T100, T100C, T100D, and T100E.  These animals were heading northbound toward Oak Harbor allowing us to spend over an hour with them!  We had beautiful weather conditions and were able to spend over an hour with these whales.  When it came time to head home we traveled past La Conner up the Swinomish Slough viewing several great blue herons, black oyster catchers and cormorants along the way.  What a way to spend the morning!



3:30PM

Leaving the dock under our continued sunny and warm skies, we made our first stop near Bird Rocks where we spotted several harbor seals and a Stellar sea lion hauled out warming themselves on the rocks.  We continued south toward the end of Lopez Island doing another slow down past Castle Rock and then continuing out to the Strait of Juan de Fuca.  As we made our way into the Straight we came across the T65A and T37A transient groups of killer whales : T65A, T65A2, T65A3, T65A4 and T65A5, as well as, T37A, T37A2, T37A3 and T37A4.  These two groups seemed to just be milling around, continuing to stay in the same general area.  We spent some time with these whales and continued on the search for what else the evening might hold in store for us. We pushed further to the east and found the T11s (T11 and T11A) swimming toward Whidbey Island. Beautiful as they surfaced together. Then some other orcas caught my eye, we left the T11s and went to see who else we had in the vicinity. It was the T46Bs (T46B, T46B1, T46B1A, T46B2, T46B3 and T46B4). We had some nice looks as they cruised to the south. We turned and headed toward homeport. We stopped by north Smith Island and sharp-eyed, off-duty crew member, Sam, found us a tufted puffin near the kelp. Then, we started seeing more, and more tufted puffins. My guess is over 10 tufted puffins within a very small area! We cruised home in the beautiful evening light!







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All Three Locations Enjoy Multi-Species Tours!



Anacortes

We headed south this morning down Rosario straight and made a swing in to Castle rock. While we went through we got some great looks at a bald eagle on Castle rock and another perched on a snag on Lopez island. After that we powered up for the long haul and trekked out toward Victoria. We scoured the seas as we went but found nothing and pressed on. We had reports of whales at Beecher and it definitely paid off to make the run. When we got to Beecher bay we met up with the T60A’s and they gave us some great looks. When we first arrived they were playing in some bull kelp and even spy hopped a few times for us. We followed them up into Beecher bay before time ran out and it was time to head out. On our way east we made a stop at race rocks for looks at some steller sea lions, California sea lions, harbor seals, and Olly the otter. Olly put on a show for us as he cleaned himself and splashed around in the water. After that we powered up and continued on when out of no where captain Scott spotted a humpback whale. We stopped and spent a little time with the whale and got a couple of fluke shots before having to press onward. We then continued to the dock getting lots of great views as we went.

Port Angeles

9:30 AM Tour

Triple header!!!!!!! We started out our trip watching a large group of harbor seals on Ediz Hook then we headed north across the straits. A report had come in of whales near Vancouver Island and when we arrived there was a small gray whale slowly heading east along the shore. We watched this little guy for awhile but he was elusive and not showing much of himself so we moved on to our next whale not far away which turned out to be a humpback whale. We got some really nice looks as he fluked occasionally but even so he was a whale that has been seen before but is not in our catalogs. He showed signs of being attacked as a calf by transient orcas as he had lots of rake marks on his flukes. Off to our third set of whales this time a family of transient orcas traveling along the shore in what appeared to be a hunting mode browsing through the kelp. That is until they came to a huge bed of kelp where we thought they might have had a seal but it turns out they just stopped to play in the kelp for at least forty minutes sphyhopping and rolling on their sides. It was an incredible sight to see. It was hard to pull ourselves away when it came time to head back to port but we did so reluctantly knowing we had witnessed a family of orcas just simply enjoying themselves.


3:00 PM Tour

Doubleheader!!! Our friendly harbor seals on Ediz hook greeted us as we made our way out into the Salish Sea.They lined the beach and played in the surf. The wind had kicked up a bit and whitecaps appeared but the ride was smooth. A harbor porpoise sighting gave us some excitement as we thought it was possibly orcas from the description but alas it was just harbor porpoise. We ventured over to the Canadian waters where we found our same humpback from the morning trip feeding. He fluked quite a bit and had many direction changes. While we waited for him to resurface a California sea lion suddenly appeared next to the boat and just as quickly disappeared.We looked for a second humpback that was reported but we never found him and then we searched for some orcas that were further west with no luck. Another report of orcas found to the east of us had us heading back from where we came. We came across a pod of about 10 animals that were spread out and just started porpoising when we got there heading east. They kept this up for a bit and then suddenly just stopped seemingly to catch their breath. it appeared we had at least two families of orcas one whom we could identify as the T11’s.  We enjoyed their company as the sun started setting and we finally had to part ways and head for home.

La Conner


We headed south this morning down Rosario Strait and made a swing in to Castle Rock. While we went through we got some great looks at a bald eagle on Castle rock and another perched on a snag on Lopez island. After that we powered up for the long haul and trekked out toward Victoria. We scoured the seas as we went but found nothing and pressed on. We had reports of whales at Beecher and it definitely paid off to make the run. When we got to Beecher bay we met up with the T60A’s and they gave us some great looks. When we first arrived they were playing in some bull kelp and even spy hopped a few times for us. We followed them up into Beecher bay before time ran out and it was time to head out. On our way east we made a stop at race rocks for looks at some steller sea lions, California sea lions, harbor seals, and Olly the otter. Olly put on a show for us as he cleaned himself and splashed around in the water. After that we powered up and continued on when out of no where captain Scott spotted a humpback whale. We stopped and spent a little time with the whale and got a couple of fluke shots before having to press onward. We then continued to the dock getting lots of great views as we went.









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Clear Skies, Calm Waters, and LOTS of Whales!

Anacortes

10:00 AM


We headed out with clear blue skies and flat calm water. As we cruised down Rosario strait Captain Carl found us a minke whale that gave us some great looks. After that we continued south toward the Olympic peninsula we got two harbor seals in a very intense fight at Smith bank. They were really at each other’s throats. We continued from there to eastern bank where we joined two humpbacks that were traveling east. We got lots of flukes from them as they traveled west. After that we went toward Dungeness spit and joined the T60’s. We had an amazing show watching them as they traveled taking the occasion deep dive. We were seeing lots of porpoise near the T’s but they seemed uninterested. After that we headed to Colville for some more harbor seals and then returned to anacortes

3:30 PM 
We cut north up the east side of Guemes Island, heading in the direction of recent whale reports. We continued north past Barnes and Clark, stopping on the north side of Sucia to visit with over fifty hauled out harbor seals and some foraging oyster catchers. Not ten minutes later we were on scene with transient killer whales. We had to cut the engines as they made an abrupt turn to come check out our boat. We sat in awe as the T65A pod of five dove under our boat and continued towards Mt. Baker in the distance. We cruised with them for some time, watching as they slowly cruised and appeared to be in resting mode. We hugged the west coast of Lumi Island on our trip home, stopping off at Viti Rocks to watch the double-crested cormorants drying out after their dives. 

Port Angeles

Fantastic is the only way to describe the weather conditions. Blue skies. mirror like water and warm air all made for the perfect day. We headed north knowing there were reports of transient orcas near Trial Island heading south. Along the way we spotted harbor porpoise and lots of common murres. Mt Baker was outstanding today. Making our way across the straits we eventually caught up the the orcas to find the T60 family of 5 including T60 the mom, her 16 year old son T60C, his younger brother T60D, a nine yearly sibling T60E and their youngest sister at 5 years old T60E. They were traveling west  as a family unit for quite a while and then they separated  into 2 groups in possibly hunt mode. We stayed with them for along time and as other boats arrived on scene we decided to go look for other animals. We headed east to where our sister ship the IE5 had found 2 humpbacks  and had some amazing closeups as the came along side our boat. As we got their they decided they needed to go somewhere out west so they started traveling side by side  as we kept pace with them getting some really great looks at their flukes and finding they are not in our ID catalog,one being a solid  black fluke the other an all white fluke..Their travels once again took us near to our orca family as they had continued traveling south so we departed the humpbacks to go watch the orcas one more time. Lucky for us they headed west and took us towards home so we were able to get some more quality time with the T60’s  and even had some awesome close passes. We couldn’t have asked for a more perfect day.



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There are only a handful of 2.5-hour La Conner wildlife cruises remaining this season, including one this evening at 6:00 PM. Tonight’s weather should make for a spectacular time on the water. Tickets are just $29 plus taxes and fees! For more information, or to book, visit http://ift.tt/2oJDVLd

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Another Whale-Filled Day!


Port Angeles

9:30 AM

The day started with mostly blue skies and a gentle breeze! As we left the harbor we got to see a large cluster of harbor seals relaxing on the beach. We decided to head west on the search for whales. With help from our whale watching friends from Victoria, we found a humpback whale south of secretary island. We were able to hang out alongside the whale for an hour as it seemed to take a nap! However, at one point the whale seemed to wake up and performed a big peduncle throw! After getting looks at the tail we realized it was Stitch! We then headed east toward race rocks, which was full of more sleepy wildlife! Sundays must be rest day for everyone! We saw many more harbor seals, stellar sea lions, California sea lions, and a gull trying to steal a snack from Ollie the sea otter! It was a beautiful way to spend a morning on the water!






3:00 PM


This afternoon the wind picked up enough to give us an adventurous ride! With reports of killer whales last spotted near dungeness spit, we headed east in search of the whales! We were able to catch the whales as they were heading west! We identified the pod as the T30s with what looked like a very young calf! We got great looks as the whales surfed in the waves! Then when the whales turned north, we were about to head away when we spotted two heart shaped blows off behind us — humpback whales!! These whales seemed to be in a resting pattern and slowly traveled east. We got excellent looks at our second whale species of the day before heading to the tip of the spit to see a group of harbor seals and making our way home!





Anacortes

10:00 AM

Headed out this morning with nice weather coming in. We made our first stop at Pointer island for some harbor seals. Before entering Thatcher pass reports came in of animals to the south so we made a quick turn and headed south in Rosario Strait. We began passing harbor porpoise and then headed to Castle rock for a nice slow up. We found a mature eagle on Castle rock and a few sea stars on Blind island. From there we cruised south passed Smith island and met up with a group of Orcas just north of protection island. It was the T30’s and they gave us many good looks as they made a few close passes to the boat. After an amazing show from the orcas we headed back to Smith island where we found a bunch of tufted puffins. It was an amazing day on the water

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3:30 PM 

This time we went out Guemes channel and headed north in rosario strait. We got great views of mount baker, sea birds and porpoise as we went along. Our first stop was at Peapod Rocks for looks at dozens of harbor seals and even a mature bald eagle. After that we headed around orcas island and joined a group of orcas just south of the Sisters. It was the T65A’s and they gave us a spectacular show. At one point they graced with a very close pass just feet off the side of the boat. We got some amazing looks at them as we followed them south in the strait. After that we cruised up to lummi island and went down her western shore. We made a stop at Vendovi Island for looks at another mature bald eagle before returning around the north side of Guemes to Anacortes.



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