Close swim by Humpback Whale!

Port Angeles.

Highlights:
*Lots of birds throughout the Juan de Fuca Strait.
*Great views of Race Rocks Lighthouse with lots of wildlife on the rocks.
*Humpback Whale MMY0024 swimming along a current line traveling West.
*Another Humpback Whale, just West of Race Rocks, making lots of turns in the water and popping up right next to the boat.
*Bright White Pectoral flippers visible as the Humpback Whale swam by the boat, just under the surface of the water.

Photo Credit to Lee Leddy

Naturalist Log:

It
was another beautiful day out on the Juan de Fuca Strait. The sun was shining
and the waters remained calm. We entered the open waters and headed north
exploring several of the shallow banks. When we entered Canadian waters, we
headed towards the beautiful Race Rocks Lighthouse. Before reaching the
lighthouse area, a sharp-eyed passenger spotted an exhalation in the distance
south of Race Rocks Island. So, Captain Tom turned that direction. All eyes
were on deck scanning the waters in search of the exhalations. After several
minutes, we decided to travel through the Race Rocks area while still keeping
an eye out for the whale in the distance.
Race
Rocks was a great area to explore. The rocks around the lighthouse and the
minor rocky islands were covered with Steller Sea Lions, California Sea Lions
and Harbor Seals. The California Sea Lions were barking loudly while the
Steller Sea Lions were grunting and disputing their territories. Several rocks
also had various birds on top, including some Cormorants.
Just
after passing through Race Rocks, a tall exhalation was spotted. We quickly
made the turn and headed that way. As we approached the Whale dove for its
deeper dive and showed off its flukes. The white tops of the flukes and
markings matched our I.D. for MMY0024. MMY0024 was traveling mostly Westward,
following a curvy current line. After a few great looks, we said goodbye and
turned to explore some more water. We did not have to travel far, as another
exhalation was quickly spotted. The next whale was not following the current
line and instead was making several zigs and zags – perhaps on the search for
fish. As we got a good look at the underside of the tail, we realized that this
whale was not in our i.d. book. How awesome! A new whale for the I.D. database.
As we scanned the waters, looking for the whale to resurface, we got a pleasant
surprise as the whale surfaced right next to the port side of the boat. It was
so close that while it swam just under the surface, the bright white pectoral
flippers were easily seen and followed. It was breath-taking.
Eventually
the time came and we made our way back to Port Angeles after a great Humpback
whale day.

0
false

18 pt
18 pt
0
0

false
false
false

/* Style Definitions */
table.MsoNormalTable
{mso-style-name:”Table Normal”;
mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
mso-style-noshow:yes;
mso-style-parent:””;
mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;
mso-para-margin:0in;
mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;
mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
font-size:12.0pt;
font-family:”Times New Roman”;
mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria;
mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;
mso-fareast-font-family:”Times New Roman”;
mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast;
mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria;
mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}

~Tamara

from Blogger http://ift.tt/1Ls3VQO
via IFTTT

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s